Langston Hughes Story

The video is about the fight to keep Langston Hughes Elementary School in Baltimore open.  The video was filmed and produced as a collaborative effort between teachers and staff in the Teachers’ Democracy Project and folks at New Lens.  There are also blogs and other media pieces related to the fight on our website under “Media” and “Blogs”.

Why Schools Can't Go Back to The Way They Were

Jessica Shiller, from Towson University led a discussion with the participants about how funding is radically unequal between schools, how communities are radically different, but how all schools are expected to do an equally good job. She also shared messages about how we need community schools that more authentically engage community; we need to stop bashing parents for their disengagement; and we need to realize that parents care about their child’s education, but many have been alienated by schools. We lament about Baltimore's population decline, but we are not acknowledging that there are a whole lot of people who stay, who are from Baltimore, and who matter.

Lessons from Chicago and New York

The following videos are conversations we had with teachers and community members in Chicago about community and schools. 

 

Other Advocacy Videos

The following videos are by teachers exploring the teacher evaluation system in Baltimore City. 



School Stories

Teachers' Democracy Project has invited teachers, youth, and other community stakeholders to tell their stories at our events and at community story circles. The following stories are from our Human Face of Policy event and story circles that took place in Park Heights at at our home base. We hope these stories help share the struggles and strengths of schools and build a more democratic critique and vision for the school system moving forward. We are using these stories as a first step in a deeper inquiry into how to create more community and teacher controlled schools.


Teacher Videos On Social Justice Pedagogy


Story Circles

TDP conducted story circles in a variety of communities.