Why One Pagers?

 Many Baltimore based scholars have pointed out the striking similarity between old maps from the early 20th Century that show the practice of "redlining" (where banks denied mortgages to whole neighborhoods based solely on race), combined with the presence of "neighborhood covenants" (which required home owners to refuse to sell to certain groups in order to retain the White and non-Jewish make-up of the neighborhood) and maps that show the intensity of poverty (and its associated ills of drug use, untimely deaths, unemployment and massive rates of incarceration) in modern day Baltimore.  

Many Baltimore based scholars have pointed out the striking similarity between old maps from the early 20th Century that show the practice of "redlining" (where banks denied mortgages to whole neighborhoods based solely on race), combined with the presence of "neighborhood covenants" (which required home owners to refuse to sell to certain groups in order to retain the White and non-Jewish make-up of the neighborhood) and maps that show the intensity of poverty (and its associated ills of drug use, untimely deaths, unemployment and massive rates of incarceration) in modern day Baltimore.  

facts that shift the narrative…

There is a tendency for politicians, residents from the rest of Maryland, and even some who live in Baltimore, to blame young Black men, and Black families, or to blame teachers and their schools, for what in fact has been a history of government-based, government-endorsed, and racist-driven, deliberate policy.  This overarching policy involved first creating hyper-segregation, and then starving these same Black neighborhoods of resources such as jobs, roads, public transportation, decent housing, and money for schools and their buildings.  These one pagers are designed to put current education issues into a critical historical perspective using a lens that avoids blame based on race and acknowledges how policies of the past have helped precipitate current problems.

Each one-pager represents just the tip of the iceberg in terms of available research.  They are intended to give teachers, parents, and community members easy access to answers to common questions and concerns--answers that challenge the normal narrative around what is wrong with our schools.